Kettlebell Series: Glutes

Kylie from Rich Souls Co. demonstrates a glutes kettlebell routine that can be done anywhere.

Join the Collective for FREE Wellness Guides. Exclusive Deals. Supportive Community.
January 4, 2018

Disclaimer: Just so you know, if you order an item through one of our posts, we may get a small share of the sale.

 Not sure which kettlebell to start with? Choosing the right kettlebell (here’s one we like) depends on both your fitness level and the type of workout movement you’re planning to do.

For accelerated moves, such as swings, active beginners should start with 18 to 26 pounds, whereas those who are intermediate to advanced should start with 26 to 35 pounds.

For slower, more controlled movements, start with 13 to 18 pounds—or 18 to 26 pounds if that’s not enough of a challenge.

For overhead movements, you should be able to complete 8 to 10 controlled reps. Do what feels comfortable for you, but be sure to safely challenge yourself.

The exercises featured in this video are:

Kneeling Squats

  • Place a yoga mat, soft rug, or pillow under your knees for support.
  • Kneel on the support.
  • Hold kettlebell with both hands at chest level, close to the body.
  • Elongate and engage your core, shoulders back.
  • Slowly lower your hips down to sit on your heels.
  • Squeeze your glutes to extend your hips forward, returning to your kneeling position.
  • Repeat 12 times.

Kettlebell Romanian Deadlift

  • Begin with feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, core engaged, and shoulders back.
  • Holding kettlebell in both hands with arms fully extended in front of you, hinge at the hips, keeping the kettlebell near the body.
  • Bend until you feel a slight stretch in your hamstrings.
  • While keeping your core engaged and maintaining a neutral spine, squeeze the glutes and extend the hips to come to a standing position.
  • Repeat 12 times.

1 ¼ Squat

  • Begin with feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointed slightly outward, holding the kettlebell in both hands held at chest level, close to the body.
  • Bend at the knees and hinge at the hips, lowering yourself until your knees are bent at 90 degrees—as if you are sitting back onto your heels.
  • Slowly pulse up about a quarter of the way and lower back down, using your glutes to drive the motion, then squeeze your glutes and extend your hips, returning to a standing position.
  • Together this results in a 1 ¼ squat that gives extra attention to the glutes.
  • Maintain a neutral spine and engaged core throughout the entire range of motion.
  • Repeat 12 times.

Single-Leg Romanian Deadlift

  • Begin with feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, core engaged, and shoulders back.
  • Hold kettlebell in one hand, with your arm extended down by your side.
  • Kick the opposite leg straight back, raising the heel toward the ceiling as you lower the kettlebell toward the ground like a seesaw.
  • Swing your back leg forward as you come to a standing position, driving the knee through.
  • Keep your back flat and your core engaged throughout the entire range of motion.
  • For a modified version, don’t kick the leg as high; simply hover the foot off the ground and use the ground for support and guidance.
  • Repeat 12 times on each leg.

Hip Openers

  • Begin with feet shoulder-width apart, core engaged, shoulders back, holding the kettlebell in one hand with the arm fully extended down by your side.
  • Drive the knee of the opposite leg up and hold.
  • Be sure the hip of the standing leg is engaged and held in tightly to ensure you aren’t leaning to one side. This awareness will help you engage the glute muscles responsible for hip abduction.
  • From here, rotate the knee of the opposite leg out and back, drawing an imaginary half circle.
  • Lower your leg to tap the ground behind you, lift, and rotate the knee forward to its starting position.
  • These motions can be referred to as opening and closing the gate.
  • For a modified version, point and drag toe in the half-circle motion as opposed to lifting the foot and knee. This way the ground can be used for stability and balance.
  • Repeat 12 times on each leg.

RELATED
Kettlebell Exercises: Are They The Missing Staple In Your Workout Routine?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR