5 Types Of Runners Who Should Join A 5K

Think a 5K distance race is for beginners only? Think again! Every type of runner can benefit from running the 3.1 mile distance race. Here are a few reasons why.

March 2, 2016
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One of the reasons I love the 5K race distance is because it is inclusive of all types of runners. Head to a local 5K in your community and look around: You will notice runners of every age, sex, athletic ability, shape, and size. That is because at 3.1 miles, the 5K is the perfect distance for beginners and experienced runners alike. It is a short enough distance that it’s an attainable goal for even the most beginner runner. Yet, a 5K is just long enough that it is a challenge for experienced runners who truly like to race and push their physical limits. If you asked me who should run a 5K race, my answer would be: absolutely everyone. Here are just a few examples of who should run a 5K and why they should do it.

New Runner

It’s your first race!

A 5K is a perfect introduction to the racing world. From bib pickup to a starting corral, timing chips, and aide stations, a 5K typically has all of the components of a much longer race, but at only 3.1 miles. It is a great distance to “get your feet wet” (sometimes even literally, depending on the weather) in the world of running organized events. You’ll learn how to seed yourself at the starting line (you might start too far up or too far back), how to pace yourself from the beginning to finish strong (because the excitement might cause you to go out too fast) and how to grab and drink that cup of water from a volunteer while running (you’ll probably get water all over your shirt).

I didn’t add all of those comments to sound condescending, but more to demonstrate that one of the best ways to learn is through trial and error. Your first 5K gives you the perfect opportunity to learn through doing.

Experienced Runner

You are a dedicated long distance runner.

You put in countless miles per week training for half, full, or even ultra marathons. Your “short” runs are typically an hour or more. When was the last time you truly tested your lactic threshold outside of perhaps some Yasso 800 intervals? When was the last time you raced a 5k? Training for and racing a 5K can help mix up your training, both physically and mentally. You will tap into different energy sources and use different muscle fibers as you push for that finish line sprint. Plus, the shortened training schedule might give your body and mind a break from potential burnout. Lastly, taking time to focus on speed for a while might actually carry over into your marathon training, taking some time off of your long distance personal records.

Philanthropist Runner

You want to support your local community.

Countless local and national organizations host 5K charity fundraisers. From breast cancer awareness to the local pet shelter to raising funds for a local elementary school’s new playground…the possibilities are endless. A 5K is a great way to support your local community while simultaneously doing something that you love.

Share the Love Runner

You want all of your friends and family to experience the joy of running!

Let’s face it, trying to convince a non-runner that running is the greatest thing since sliced bread can be a difficult task. Most people think back to the days of struggling through the forced one mile run in high school or slaving away on a treadmill in the gym for weight loss purposes, and think “no way am I going to run for fun.”

But so many of those people change their tune once they are introduced to the fun and exciting world of road (and trail) racing. Having a specific event to train for makes those runs seem more purposeful and thus more enjoyable. So even if you feel your racing days are beyond 5Ks, doing one with some “I’m not really a fan of running” friends may be just the push they need to see why you love running as much as you do.

The “You Need to Have Fun” Runner

You’re burnt out, stressed out, and starting to forget why you love running so much.

Inflatable 5K. Color Run 5K. Glow in the Dark 5K. Donut (pizza, hot dog) 5K. Themed 5Ks are popping up all over the place with crazy, wacky, fun themes. Sure, some of these may seem absolutely ridiculous. But the truth is, even the most focused, disciplined runners sometimes need a break from their serious training schedules to let loose, ignore their pace, and laugh. If you are feeling stressed or burnt out with your training, give one of these silly races a try. It’ll put a smile on your face, and the non-competitive atmosphere may be just what you need to reignite that love-for-running flame in your heart.

So, don’t write off the 5K as simply a “beginners” race. For these reasons (and more), you should find a 5K to add to your racing calendar this year!

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